Linguistics

New Approaches to Applied Linguistics

Series editors: Mark Garner, Annabelle Mooney and Barbara Fennell

This series provides an outlet for academic monographs and edited volumes that offer a contemporary and original contribution to applied linguistics. Applied linguistics is understood in a broad sense, to encompass language pedagogy and second-language learning, discourse analysis, bi- and multilingualism, language policy and planning, language use in the internet age, lexicography, professional and organisational communication, literacies, forensic linguistics, pragmatics, and other fields associated with solving real-life language and communication problems. Interdisciplinary contributions, and research that challenges disciplinary assumptions, are particularly welcomed. The series does not impose limitations in terms of methodology or genre and does not support a particular linguistic school. Whilst the series volumes are of a high scholarly standard, they are intended to be accessible to researchers in other fields and to the interested general reader.

New Approaches to Applied Linguistics is based at the Centre for Language Assessment Research, University of Roehampton.

Language, Migration and Identity

Series Editor: Professor Vera Regan, University College Dublin

This series fills a hitherto neglected but now growing area in the treatment of migration: the role of language and identity. This topic is central in a globalized world where the definition of community is constantly challenged by the increased mobility of individuals. Linked to this mobility is the issue of identity construction, in which language plays a key role. Language practices are indicators of the socialization process in bilingual and multilingual settings, and part of the strategies by which speakers assert membership within social groups. Migrant speakers are constantly engaged in identity construction in varying settings.

Language, Migration and Identity invites proposals for revised dissertations, monographs and edited volumes on language practices and language use by migrant speakers. A wide range of themes is envisaged, within the area of migration, but from a broadly linguistic perspective. The series welcomes studies of migrant communities and their language practices, studies of language practices in multilingual educational settings, and case studies of identity building among migrants through language use. Proposals might focus on topics such as second language acquisition in social context, variation in L2 speech, multilingualism, acquisition of sociolinguistic competence, hybridity and ‘crossing’ in relation to identity. A multiplicity of approaches in the treatment of this interdisciplinary area will be welcome, from quantitative to ethnographic to mixed methods.

The series welcomes established scholars as well as early career academics and recent PhD research.

Intercultural Studies and Foreign Language Learning

Series editors: Theo Harden and Arnd Witte

Learning a foreign language facilitates the most intimate access one can get to the culture and society of another language community. The process of learning a foreign language always involves intercultural levels of engagement between the languages and cultures concerned. This process is also a long and arduous one which involves an enormous variety of factors. These factors are located on individual, socio-cultural and linguistic planes. They engage in a complex interplay between any elements of these more general planes and the concrete learning process of the learner.

The series Intercultural Studies and Foreign Language Learning provides a forum for publishing research in this area. It publishes monographs, edited collections and volumes of primary material on any aspect of intercultural research. The series is not limited to the field of applied linguistics but also includes relevant research from linguistic anthropology, language learning pedagogy, translation studies and language philosophy.

Historical Sociolinguistics:

Studies on Language and Society in the Past

Series Editors: Nils Langer, Stephan Elspaß, Joseph Salmons and Wim Vandenbussche

The interdisciplinary field of Historical Sociolinguistics seeks to reveal the impact of language development on society and the role of individuals and society in the changing forms and usage of language. This book series is aimed at sociolinguists and social historians who are keen to publish studies on the social history of languages, the interaction of linguistic practices and society, and the sociological significance of linguistic variation with a historical dimension. The purpose of the series is to provide empirically supported studies that will challenge and advance current language historiographies, which often continue to present the history of particular languages as necessarily leading to the creation of a standard or prestige variety. Of particular interest are topics such as the following: language myths and language ideology, historical multilingualism and the formation of nation-states, the sociolinguistics of minority and regional languages, the rise of urban vernaculars, immigrants and their languages, the role of prescriptive grammarians, and the social history of pidgins and creoles.

Book proposals from historians and linguists working on any language in any period are welcome, in particular those that include a comparative dimension as well as those with a strong empirical foundation. The language of publication is primarily English. All publications will be peer reviewed; the four series editors and twenty-five members of the advisory board are all members of the Historical Sociolinguistics Network (HiSoN) <http://www.hison.ac.uk>.

Contemporary Studies in Descriptive Linguistics

Series editors: Karl Bernhardt and Graeme Davis

This series provides an outlet for academic monographs which offer a recent and original contribution to linguistics and which are within the descriptive tradition.

While the monographs demonstrate their debt to contemporary Linguistic thought, the series does not impose limitations in terms of methodology or genre, and does not support a particular linguistic school. Rather the series welcomes new and innovative research that contributes to furthering the understanding of the description of language.

The topics of the monographs are scholarly and represent the cutting edge for their particular fields, but are also accessible to researchers outside the specific disciplines.

Contemporary Studies in Descriptive Linguistics is based at the Department of English, University of Buckingham.

Studies in Historical Linguistics

Series editors: Karl Bernhardt, Graeme Davis and Mark Garner

Studies in Historical Linguistics brings together work which utilises the comparative method of language study.
Topics include the examination of language change over time, the genetic classification of language, lexicography, dialectology and etymology. Pronunciation, lexis, morphology and syntax are examined within the framework of historical linguistics. Both synchronic and diachronic approaches are used so that language is examined both at one time and across time.
Historical Linguistics is still a young area of academic study, but it has its foundations in one of the oldest – philology. This series recognises both the seminal importance of philology, and the recent development through the conceptual framework provided by linguistic science.
Studies in Historical Linguistics is based at the Department of Media, Culture and Languages at the University of Roehampton.

New Trends in Translation Studies

Series Editor: Jorge Diaz-Cintas

In today’s globalised society, translation and interpreting are gaining visibility and relevance as a means to foster communication and dialogue in increasingly multicultural and multilingual environments. Practised since time immemorial, both activities have become more complex and multifaceted in recent decades, intersecting with many other disciplines. New Trends in Translation Studies is an international series with the main objectives of promoting the scholarly study of translation and interpreting and of functioning as a forum for the translation and interpreting research community.
This series publishes research on subjects related to multimedia translation and interpreting, in their various social roles. It is primarily intended to engage with contemporary issues surrounding the new multidimensional environments in which translation is flourishing, such as audiovisual media, the internet and emerging new media and technologies. It sets out to reflect new trends in research and in the profession, to encourage flexible methodologies and to promote interdisciplinary research ranging from the theoretical to the practical and from the applied to the pedagogical.
New Trends in Translation Studies publishes translation- and interpreting-oriented books that present high-quality scholarship in an accessible, reader-friendly manner. The series embraces a wide range of publications – monographs, edited volumes, conference proceedings and translations of works in translation studies which do not exist in English. The editor, Dr Jorge Díaz Cintas, welcomes proposals from all those interested in being involved with the series. The working language of the series is English, although in exceptional circumstances works in other languages can be considered for publication. Proposals dealing with specialised translation, translation tools and technology, audiovisual translation and the field of accessibility to the media are particularly welcomed.

This series is based at the Centre for Translation Studies (CenTraS), University College London (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/centras).

German Linguistic and Cultural Studies

Series editor: Peter Rolf Lutzeier

At a time when German Studies faces a serious challenge to its identity and
position in the European and international context, this new series aims to
ref lect the increasing importance of both culture (in the widest sense) and
linguistics to the study of German in Britain and Ireland.
GLCS will publish monographs and collections of essays of a high scholarly standard
which deal with German in its socio-cultural context, in multilingual and multicultural
settings, in its European and international context and with its use in the media. The
series will also explore the impact on German society of particular ideas, movements
and economic trends and will discuss curriculum provision and development in universities in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Contributions in English or German will be welcome.

For information about submitting proposals to these series, please contact oxford@peterlang.com.

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