German

German Studies in America

Series Editors: Celia Applegate, Gail K. Hart, Kai Evers, Susan E. Gustafson and Peter Meilaender

German Studies in America publishes research across the field of German studies in the broadest sense, from literary criticism to cultural studies. The editors welcome scholarly work that takes an innovative approach to German, Swiss, or Austrian history, literature, politics, philosophy, national identity, religion, popular culture, film, music, and/or visual art. We are also eager to consider projects that adopt interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches as well as studies with theoretical approaches including psychoanalysis, gender studies, feminism, Marxism, critical race studies, etc. We publish scholarly monographs, translations and edited volumes of essays in both German and English. This series adheres to the highest academic standards and is peer reviewed.

Women, Gender and Sexuality in German Literature and Culture

Series Editor: Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly

Women, Gender and Sexuality in German Literature and Culture continues the mission of the book series Women in German Literature, which launched nearly twenty years ago. Originally focused primarily on women writers, the series is now expanding its remit to cover German cultural production more broadly and to include studies relating to gender and sexuality.

The series welcomes proposals for monographs and rigorously edited essay collections focusing on the work of women and LGBTQ+ creators as well as the representation of women, gender and/or sexuality in literature, media and culture from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series contributes to efforts to broaden the German canon by publishing pioneering studies of relatively unknown writers, artists and filmmakers and cutting-edge assessments of more established figures. Studies of the history of women in German-speaking culture, such as the participation of women in German intellectual life and the struggle for equal rights, as well as historical considerations of gender and sexuality in German-speaking countries, are also encouraged.

Editorial Board: Helga Druxes (Williams College), Georgina Paul (University of Oxford), Helmut Puff (University of Michigan) and Yasemin Yildiz (University of California, Los Angeles)

 

Studies in Modern German and Austrian Literature

Series Editors: Robert Vilain, Benedict Schofield and Alexandra Lloyd

Studies in Modern German and Austrian Literature is a broadly conceived series that aims to publish significant research and scholarship devoted to German and Austrian literature of all forms and genres from the eighteenth century to the present day. The series promotes the analysis of intersections of literature with thought, society and other art forms, such as film, theatre, autobiography, music, painting, sculpture and performance art. It includes monographs on single authors or works, focused historical periods, and studies of experimentation with form and genre. Wider ranging explorations of literary, cultural or socio-political phenomena in the German-speaking lands or among writers in exile and analyses of national, ethnic and cultural identities in literature are also welcome topics.
Proposals are invited for monographs, high-quality doctoral dissertations revised for book publication, focused collections of essays (including selectively edited conference proceedings), annotated editions and bibliographies. Senior figures in the academic profession as well as early career or independent scholars are encouraged to submit proposals. All proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed. We publish in both German and English. This series is a successor to Studies in Modern German Literature, edited by Peter D.G. Brown.

German Visual Culture

Series Editor: Christian Weikop

German Visual Culture invites research on German art across different periods, geographical locations, and political contexts. Books in the series engage with aesthetic and ideological continuities as well as ruptures and divergences between individual artists, movements, systems of art education, art institutions, and cultures of display. Challenging scholarship that interrogates and updates existing orthodoxies in the field is desirable.

A guiding question of the series is the impact of German art on critical and public spheres, both inside and outside the German-speaking world. Reception is thus conceived in the broadest possible terms, including both the ways in which art has been perceived and defined as well as the ways in which modern and contemporary German artists have undertaken visual dialogues with their predecessors or contemporaries. Issues of cultural transfer, critical race theory and related postcolonial analysis, feminism, queer theory, and other interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged, as are studies on production and consumption, especially the art market, pioneering publishing houses, and the ‘little magazines’ of the avant-garde.

All proposals for monographs and edited collections in the history of German visual culture will be considered, although English will be the language of all contributions. Submissions are subject to rigorous peer review. The series will be promoted through the series editor’s Research Forum for German Visual Culture (https://www.eca.ed.ac.uk/research/research-forum-german-visual-culture), which he founded at the University of Edinburgh in 2011, and which has involved various symposia and related publications, all connected to an international network of Germanist scholars.

Imagining Black Europe

Series Editors: Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

This series seeks to publish critical and nuanced scholarship in the field of Black European Studies. Moving beyond and building on the Black Atlantic approach, books in this series will underscore the existence, diversity and evolution of Black Europe. They will provide historical, intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives on how Black diasporic peoples have reconfigured the boundaries of Black identity making, claim making and politics; created counterdiscourses and counterpublics on race, colonialism, postcolonialism and racism; and forged transnational connections and solidarities across Europe and the globe. The series will also illustrate the ways that Black European diasporic peoples have employed intellectual, socio-political, artistic/cultural, affective, digital and pedagogical work to aid their communities and causes, challenge their exclusion and cultivate ties with their allies, thus gaining recognition in their societies and beyond.

Representing the field’s dynamic growth methodologically, geographically and culturally, the series will also collectively interrogate notions of Blackness, Black diasporic culture and Europeanness while also challenging the boundaries of Europe. Books in the series will critically examine how race and ethnicity intersect with the themes of gender, nationality, class, religion, politics, kinship, sexuality, affect and the transnational, offering comparative and international perspectives. One of the main goals of the series is to introduce and produce rigorous academic research that connects not only with individuals in academia but also with a broader public.

Areas of interest:

  • Social movements
  • Racial discourses and politics
  • Empire, slavery and colonialism
  • Decolonialization and postcolonialism
  • Gender, sexuality and intersectionality
  • Black activism (in all its forms)
  • Racial and political violence and surveillance
  • Racial constructions
  • Diasporic practices
  • Race and racialization in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary eras
  • Identity, representation and cultural productions (music, art, literature, etc.)
  • Memory
  • Migration and immigration
  • Citizenship
  • State building and diplomacy
  • Nations and nationalisms

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Advisory Board: Hakim Adi (Chichester), Robbie Aitken (Sheffield Hallam), Catherine Baker (Hull), Eddie Bruce-Jones (Birkbeck), Alessandra Di Maio (Palermo), Akwugo Emejulu (Warwick), Philomena Essed (Antioch), Crystal Fleming (Stony Brook), David Theo Goldberg (UC Irvine), Silke Hackenesch (Cologne), Elahe Haschemi Yekani (Humboldt), Nicholas Jones (Bucknell), Silyane Larcher (CNRS), Olivette Otele (Bath Spa), Sue Peabody (Washington State), Kennetta Perry (De Montfort), Cassander L. Smith (Alabama), S. A. Smythe (UCLA)

 

Contemporary German Writers and Filmmakers

Series Editors: Julian Preece and Frank Finlay

Contemporary German Writers and Filmmakers aims to reflect the continuing and dynamic developments in German culture since the reunification of Germany in 1990. The fall of communism, the forging of the new Berlin Republic and increasing ethnic diversity have coincided with growing international acclaim for writers of German (such as Nobel Laureates Günter Grass, Elfriede Jelinek and Herta Müller) and renewed interest in German cinema (such as award-winning film Das Leben der Anderen / The Lives of Others).Each volume is devoted to the work of a contemporary German-speaking novelist, poet, playwright or filmmaker, containing an interview with its subject and, in the case of writers, an original piece of previously unpublished writing presented in parallel English translation. The other chapters on key aspects of the emerging oeuvre and its international significance are by scholars in the field. As the volumes are intended for readers with little or no knowledge of German, all quotations are translated into English. The volumes are designed as a resource for specialists and students alike and to stimulate debate within and beyond the academy.Proposals for new volumes on significant contemporary practitioners in the literary and cinematic fields are welcomed. The language of the series is English.

Exile Studies

Series Editor: Andrea Hammel

Exile Studies is a series of monographs and edited collections that takes a broad view of exile, including the life and work of refugees from National Socialism, and beyond. The series explores the different global and cultural spaces of exile and refuge as well as the specific historical, political and social concerns of exile writers and artists. The series engages with recent theoretical approaches to exile to shed new light on the unique conditions of mass flight from National Socialist persecution, with a particular interest in the work of Jewish refugees of the period. A plurality of theoretical approaches is encouraged, featuring research that reaches beyond national frameworks or disciplinary boundaries and takes multi-directional, transcultural or comparative approaches. The series aims to make connections to studies on more recent groups of refugees and to contribute to current debates. Themes include persecution, exclusion and delocalization, legacies of displacement, loss and acculturation as well as the creation of new homes and networks.

The series promotes dialogue among transnational, Jewish and memory studies, and among diaspora, Holocaust and postcolonial studies. It invites research that acknowledges questions of gender, race, class, religion and ethnicity as indispensable tools for understanding the cultural processes connected to the lives and works of refugees and exiles.

Cultural History and Literary Imagination

Series Editors: Christian J. Emden and David Midgley

This series promotes critical inquiry into the relationship between the literary imagination and its cultural, intellectual or political contexts. The series encourages the investigation of the role of the literary imagination in cultural history and the interpretation of cultural history through literature, visual culture and the performing arts.

Contributions of a comparative or interdisciplinary nature are particularly welcome. Individual volumes might, for example, be concerned with any of the following:

  • The mediation of cultural and historical memory,
  • The material conditions of particular cultural manifestations,
  • The construction of cultural and political meaning,
  • Intellectual culture and the impact of scientific thought,
  • The methodology of cultural inquiry,
  • Intermediality,
  • Intercultural relations and practices.

Acceptance is subject to advice from our editorial board, and all proposals and manuscripts undergo a rigorous peer review assessment prior to publication. The usual language of publication is English, but proposals in French, German, Italian and Spanish may also be considered.

Editorial Board: Rodrigo Cacho, University of Cambridge; Sarah Colvin, University of Cambridge; Kenneth Loiselle, Trinity University; Heather Webb, University of Cambridge.

German Life and Civilization

Series Editor: Jost Hermand

German Life and Civilization provides contributions to a critical understanding of Central European cultural history from medieval times to the present. Culture is here defined in the broadest sense, comprising expressions of high culture in such areas as literature, music, pictorial arts, and intellectual trends as well as political and sociohistorical developments and the texture of everyday life. Both the cultural mainstream and oppositional or minority viewpoints lie within the purview of the series. While it is based on specialized investigations of particular topics, the series aims to foster progressive scholarship that aspires to a synthetic view of culture by crossing traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Feuchtwanger Studies

Series Editor: Frank Stern

This series focuses on the life and work of the internationally celebrated German writer Lion Feuchtwanger (1884–1958), whose works have been translated into many languages. Of particular interest are topics such as Feuchtwanger’s role as a critic of Weimar Germany and the rise of Nazism, his years of exile in France (1933–40) and in the United States (1940–58), his achievements as a proponent of the historical novel, and his reception both in Germany and in the wider world. The series presents Feuchtwanger in the context of his times, paying special attention to his years in Southern California and his relationships with other leading cultural figures of the era.

With Feuchtwanger at its core, the series explores the multinational literary and intellectual network that resulted from German and Austrian exile under Nationalism Socialism: from Paris to Vienna, Los Angeles to London, Buenos Aires to Tel Aviv, and New York to Moscow. Contributions present cutting-edge research elaborating on the intricate relations of literary locations, emotional spaces and biographies characteristic of these important writers, artists and filmmakers. Books in the series will be of interest to those working in German studies, exile studies, Jewish studies, gender studies and film studies.

Volumes in the series include selections of refereed and reworked papers from the biennial conferences of the International Feuchtwanger Society as well as specially commissioned monographs relating to Martha and Lion Feuchtwanger, their circle and contemporaries.

Australian and New Zealand Studies in German Language and Literature

Series Editors: Gerhard Schulz (University of Melbourne) and Tim Mehigan (University of Queensland)

The series publishes scholarly works in the field of German Studies. It is aimed at profiling scholarship that has been produced in Australia and New Zealand. The series accepts submissions in German or English across the full spectrum of scholarship, ranging from doctoral dissertations and monographs to anthologies and collected essays.

Estudos Germânicos

Series Editors: Theo Harden and Júlio Cesar Neves Monteiro

Estudos Germânicos is the publishing project of the Núcleo de Estudos Germânicos at the Universidade de Brasília, which promotes awareness of Germanic Studies in Brazil and throughout the world. The book series provides a forum for Brazilian and Portuguese-language scholarship on Germanic languages, literatures and cultures. A broader understanding of Germanic is encouraged, including research not only on German and Austrian but also on Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and Afrikaans. The series is not limited to any particular field within literary studies, linguistics or translation studies and invites scholarship from the fields of anthropology, sociology, music, film studies and philosophy. An area of particular emphasis is the analysis of translations of all types of texts (literary, philosophical, sociological, etc.) both from and into the languages in question and their impact and distribution in the respective target cultures. This focal interest also implies that translations of scholarly works will be considered for publication.
The primary language of the series is Portuguese, but publications in other languages will be considered. Proposals for both monographs and edited collections are welcome.

 

Studies in Old Germanic Languages and Literature

Series Editor: Irmengard Rauch


For information about submitting proposals to these series, please contact Dr Laurel Plapp, Senior Commissioning Editor, at l.plapp@peterlang.com or oxford@peterlang.com.

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