On Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore is widely regarded as a romantic poet, speaking of beauty and truth; as a transcendentalist; a believer in the absolute; a propagandist for universal man; and as a national icon. But, as Amit Chaudhuri shows in these remarkable and widely admired essays about the poet and his milieu, his secret concern was really … Continue reading

Cooperative Collegial Democracy for Africa and Multi-ethnic Societies

It is no longer a matter of debate to state that the practice of ‘democracy’ in different African nations is almost always experienced through violence or something near to it. The principal question addressed by this work is, ‘Why are many African countries finding it difficult to practice democracy without “tears”?’ Though this unique work recognises a … Continue reading

Celtic Connections

While a number of published works approach the shared concerns of Ireland and Scotland, no major volume has offered a sustained and up-to-date analysis of the cultural connections between the two, despite the fact that these border crossings continue to be politically suggestive. The current collection addresses this area of comparative critical neglect, focusing on … Continue reading

To Veil or not to Veil

Immigration has become a contentious issue in Europe in recent decades, with immigrants being accused of resisting integration and threatening the secular fabric of nationhood. The most extreme form of this unease has invented and demonized an Islamic ‘other’ within Europe. This book poses central questions about this global staging of difference. How has such … Continue reading

Monumentality and Modernity in Hitler’s Berlin

The contentious relationship between modernism and totalitarianism is a key element in the architectural history of the twentieth century. Post-war historiography refused to admit any overlap between the high modernism of the 1920s and the architecture of National Socialism, as it contradicted the definition of modernism as the essential architectural expression of liberal democracy. However, … Continue reading

The Enclosure of an Open Mystery

The similarities and differences between poetry and worship have intrigued writers since at least the nineteenth century, when John Keble declared that poetic symbols could almost partake of the nature of sacraments. Since then poets, philosophers and literary critics alike have evoked the terms ‘sacrament’ and ‘incarnation’ to make claims about art and poetry. Extending … Continue reading

Stalin’s Ghosts

Stalin’s Ghosts examines the impact of the Gothic-fantastic on Russian literature in the period 1920-1940. It shows how early Soviet-era authors, from well-known names including Fedor Gladkov, Mikhail Bulgakov, Andrei Platonov and Evgenii Zamiatin, to niche figures such as Sigizmund Krzhizhanovskii and Aleksandr Beliaev, exploited traditional archetypes of this genre: the haunted castle, the deformed body, … Continue reading

Congratulations Amit Chaudhuri!

Amit Chaudhuri has won the Infosys Prize for outstanding contribution to the Humanities in Literary Studies. The jury for the 25 lakh (£30,000) prize includes the chair Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate in Economics and Lamont Professor at Harvard University; Homi Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of English and American Literature and Language, Harvard University; Akeel Bilgrami, Johnsonian … Continue reading

Interactivity reviewed…

Our call was answered and Ellie Hayes wrote this review of Alec Charles’ book Interactivity: How many social media notifications does the smart phone nearest you have on it, clamouring for attention, reaction or interaction?  How meaningful are they and the responses they elicit – especially compared to the events like those of the Arab … Continue reading

Francis Bacon

This collection of essays on Francis Bacon (1909-1992) pays tribute to the legacy, influence and power of his art. The volume widens the relevance of Bacon in the twenty-first century and looks at new ways of thinking about or reframing him. The contributors consider the interdisciplinary scope of Bacon’s work, which addresses issues in architecture, … Continue reading

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The Oxford International Art Fair

Oxford International Art Fair 2017 - Oxford Town Hall