New Series

Imagining Black Europe

Series Editors: Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

This series seeks to publish critical and nuanced scholarship in the field of Black European Studies. Moving beyond and building on the Black Atlantic approach, books in this series will underscore the existence, diversity and evolution of Black Europe. They will provide historical, intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives on how Black diasporic peoples have reconfigured the boundaries of Black identity making, claim making and politics; created counterdiscourses and counterpublics on race, colonialism, postcolonialism and racism; and forged transnational connections and solidarities across Europe and the globe. The series will also illustrate the ways that Black European diasporic peoples have employed intellectual, socio-political, artistic/cultural, affective, digital and pedagogical work to aid their communities and causes, challenge their exclusion and cultivate ties with their allies, thus gaining recognition in their societies and beyond.

Representing the field’s dynamic growth methodologically, geographically and culturally, the series will also collectively interrogate notions of Blackness, Black diasporic culture and Europeanness while also challenging the boundaries of Europe. Books in the series will critically examine how race and ethnicity intersect with the themes of gender, nationality, class, religion, politics, kinship, sexuality, affect and the transnational, offering comparative and international perspectives. One of the main goals of the series is to introduce and produce rigorous academic research that connects not only with individuals in academia but also with a broader public.

Areas of interest:

  • Social movements
  • Racial discourses and politics
  • Empire, slavery and colonialism
  • Decolonialization and postcolonialism
  • Gender, sexuality and intersectionality
  • Black activism (in all its forms)
  • Racial and political violence and surveillance
  • Racial constructions
  • Diasporic practices
  • Race and racialization in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary eras
  • Identity, representation and cultural productions (music, art, literature, etc.)
  • Memory
  • Migration and immigration
  • Citizenship
  • State building and diplomacy
  • Nations and nationalisms

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Advisory Board: Hakim Adi (Chichester), Robbie Aitken (Sheffield Hallam), Catherine Baker (Hull), Eddie Bruce-Jones (Birkbeck), Alessandra Di Maio (Palermo), Akwugo Emejulu (Warwick), Philomena Essed (Antioch), Crystal Fleming (Stony Brook), David Theo Goldberg (UC Irvine), Silke Hackenesch (Cologne), Elahe Haschemi Yekani (Humboldt), Nicholas Jones (Bucknell), Silyane Larcher (CNRS), Olivette Otele (Bath Spa), Sue Peabody (Washington State), Kennetta Perry (De Montfort), Cassander L. Smith (Alabama), S. A. Smythe (UCLA)

Disability, Media, Culture

Series Editors: Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Systems Thinking for Safety

Series Editor: Simon Bennett

This series draws on the success of the systems-thinking approach to safety management in commercial and military aviation, with a view to improving safety performance in other complex socio-technical systems, such as health-care, nuclear power generation, chemicals production, oil and gas extraction, deep mining and sea and rail transportation.

Following the 1977 Tenerife air disaster (that killed 583 people), a traumatised and vilified aviation industry resolved to improve its safety performance. The adoption of a systems-thinking approach to risk analysis and mitigation, expressed in innovations such as the teamworking protocol crew resource management, has benefited the industry. In 2010 the industry achieved a world accident rate for scheduled flights of 4·0 accidents per million departures. This rate reflects a total of 121 accidents out of 30,556,513 scheduled flights. You are much, much safer in a pressurised aluminium tube cruising at eighty per cent the speed of sound six miles above terra firma than you are driving up the M1 on a sunny day in a modern, gas-bag equipped automobile, fully alert and not under the influence.

The series is aimed at practitioners as well as academics and students. To this end, it is written in an accessible style with jargon explained. This reflects its purpose: to leverage change.

Printing History and Culture

Series Editors: Caroline Archer-Parré, Malcolm Dick and John Hinks

This series unites the allied fields of printing history and print culture, and is therefore concerned not only with the design, production and distribution of printed material but also its consumption, reception and impact. It includes the histories of the machinery and equipment, of the industry and its personnel, of the printing processes, the design of its artefacts (books, newspapers, journals, fine prints, and ephemera) and with the related arts and crafts, including calligraphy, type-founding, typography, papermaking, bookbinding, illustration, and publishing. It also covers the cultural context and environment in which print was produced and consumed.

Studies in the History of Healthcare

Series Editors: Linda Bryder and Martin Gorsky

Studies in the History of Healthcare provides an outlet for academic monographs (sole- or multi-authored) devoted to both the social and the intellectual dimensions of the history of medicine, with a special emphasis on public health, health care and health services. The focus of the series is on the nineteenth and/or twentieth centuries, and is international in scope. The series encourages investigations into public health including environmental health, preventive medicine, responses to lifestyle diseases, and maternal and child health. It also embraces studies of health policy, health systems and state medicine, including in colonial and postcolonial settings. While studies may focus on general medicine, they would also give appropriate weight to healthcare as it relates to sectors such as indigenous peoples, older people, mentally ill and/or other vulnerable social groups. Unless they are placed in a broad context and address significant historical questions the series does not include biographies or histories of individual institutions and organisations. The monographs included in this series reflect the cutting edge of research in the now well-established and still expanding field of medical history.

Studies in the History of Healthcare is a successor to Studies in the History of Medicine, formerly edited by Charles Webster.

The City as Place: Emotions, Experiences, and Meanings

Series Editors: Rebecca Madgin and Nicolas Kenny

The purpose of this series is to examine the city as a lived place. Specifically, we are interested in the ways in which the city is invested with meaning through everyday lived experiences. The series is particularly interested in submissions that focus on the perceptual and felt dimensions of urban places through exploring the experiential, emotional, sensory, and affective dimensions that contribute to how people behave in, feel about, and move around in cities. Books in this series will interrogate the relationship between people and place through a focus on the diverse ways in which subjective and intimate feelings are fundamental constituents of the urban experience. We encourage authors to examine the city as a lived place from a range of different perspectives, and to be inclusive of individual and collective voices in the city to better understand the historical development and contemporary evolution of diverse urban settings.

Some of the questions we seek to explore through the series include, but are not restricted to:

  • How is the city experienced, by whom, and how does this change over time?
  • Who shapes the experience of the city and for what reasons?
  • How do individual and shared joy, fear, pride, nostalgia, disgust, or other emotions, shape the meanings attributed to urban spaces?
  • How does the lived experience of, and emotional connections to, urban places inform the way particular spaces within cities are preserved and memorialized, or alternatively demolished and redeveloped?
  • In what ways is our understanding of the lived experience of the city sharpened through the lens of comparative, transnational, and global approaches?

The series seeks to examine the real and the imaginary, the representational and the non-representational, the historical and the contemporary, the remembered and the recreated in all historical periods including research on the twenty-first century city. The series is open to work covering all geographic areas, and we encourage authors, where possible and relevant, to situate their studies in comparative, transnational, or global perspectives. Books may be published in English or in French.

Genre Fiction and Film Companions

Series Editor: Simon Bacon

The Genre Fiction and Film Companions provide accessible introductions to key texts within the most popular genres of our time. Written by leading scholars in the field, brief essays on individual texts offer innovative ways of understanding, interpreting and reading. Invaluable for students, teachers and fans alike, these surveys offer new insights into the most important literary works, films, music, events and more within genre fiction and film.

Medical Humanities: Criticism and Creativity

Series Editors: Maria Vaccarella and Kimberly R. Myers

This series showcases innovative research, creativity and pedagogy in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Books in the series explore the complexities of human bodies, minds, illness and wellbeing through analytical frameworks derived from humanistic disciplines and clinical practice. The series is intended to provide an informative exchange across disciplines, contributing to debates on health-related issues from a broad range of perspectives. In addition to research monographs and edited collections, the series includes creative works as well as pedagogical texts, thus encouraging personal and theoretical reflections on the condition of the human mind/body. The series embraces the intersection of healthcare and the humanities, in its practical, theoretical, creative and educational expressions.

The series serves as a venue for publishing a range of materials: research monographs and edited collections on critical approaches to medical issues in culture; creative works that engage with medical humanities themes, accompanied by critical and educational materials; and critical, engaged or radical pedagogies on focused topics and/or for learners in the medical humanities. The series also invites research that opens up critical conversations on being human at the intersection of other forms of new humanistic knowledge, such as environmental or digital humanities. We are especially interested in collaborations between academics in the humanities and healthcare professionals.

All book proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed prior to publication. We publish in both print and electronic format. Open Access publication is particularly welcome.

Documentary Film Cultures

Series Editors: Dafydd Sills-Jones and Pietari Kääpä

This series provides a space for exploring the development of documentary film cultures in the contemporary context. The series takes an ecological approach to the study of documentary funding, production, distribution and consumption by emphasizing the interconnections between these practices and those of other media systems. It thus encourages new ways of understanding documentary films or practices as part of other, wider systems of cultural production.

Volumes may focus on specific sociopolitical environments, such as that of a nation or region. Alternatively, they may explore specific themes or production practices, such as new wave documentaries, environmentalism or indigenous film communities. Studies of shared technological platforms, including films that make use of embodied technologies or using emergent distribution platforms, are also welcome.

The series reflects not only the maturing of literature on documentary film and media production studies over the last two decades but also the growing interest amongst nonacademic and professional audiences in documentary texts as they occupy an increasingly hybrid cultural space: part journalism, part art cinema, part activism, part entertainment, part digital culture.

Editorial Board: John Corner (Liverpool University, UK), Yingchi Chu (Murdoch University, Australia), Jonathan Dovey (University of the West of England, Bristol), Susanna Helke (Aalto University, Finland), Anette Hill (Lund University, Sweden), Bert Hogenkamp (Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision), Ilona Hongisto (Macquarie University, Australia), K. P. Jayasankar (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, India), Susan Kerrigan (Newcastle University, Australia), Richard Kilborn (University of Stirling), Erik Knudsen (University of Central Lancashire, UK), David MacDougall (Australian National University), Anjali Monteiro (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai), Pablo Piedras (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina), Agnieszka Piotrowska (University of Bedfordshire, UK), Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork, Ireland), Belinda Smaill (Monash University, Australia), Inge Sorensen (University of Glasgow, UK), Bjørn Sørenssen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway), Malin Walhberg (Stockholm University, Sweden), Deane Williams (Monash University, Australia), Yingjin Zhang (UC San Diego, USA)

Studies in the British Mesolithic and Neolithic

Series Editors: Graeme Davis and David Jacques

Studies in the British Mesolithic and Neolithic presents the results of fieldwork and excavation as well as works of interpretation from all perspectives on the British Neolithic revolution. Archaeological methodology is augmented where appropriate with interdisciplinary techniques, reflecting contemporary practice in the discipline. Throughout the emphasis is on work which makes new contributions to the debate about the transition between hunter gatherer and farming cultures during this pivotal stage in British prehistory.

The series supports the archaeological community both in providing an appropriate forum for research reports as well as supporting interpretative work including cross-disciplinary research. It takes its inspiration from the work of the University of Buckingham’s excavations at Blick Mead in the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.

Studies in the British Mesolithic and Neolithic is based at the Humanities Research Institute, University of Buckingham.

Australian Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Series Editor: Anne Brewster

This interdisciplinary book series showcases dynamic, innovative research on contemporary and historical Australian culture. It aims to foster interventions in established debates on Australia as well as opening up new areas of enquiry that reflect the diversity of interests in the scholarly community. The series includes research in a range of fields across the humanities and social sciences, such as history, literature, media, philosophy, cultural studies, gender studies and politics. Proposals are encouraged in areas such as Indigenous studies, critical race and whiteness studies, women’s studies, studies in colonialism and coloniality, multiculturalism, the experimental humanities and ecocriticism. Of particular interest is research that promotes the study of Australia in cross-cultural, transnational and comparative contexts. Cross-disciplinarity and new methodologies are welcomed.

The series will feature the work of leading authors but also invites proposals from emerging scholars. Proposals for monographs and high-quality edited volumes are welcomed. Proposals and manuscripts considered for the series will be subject to rigorous peer review and editorial attention. The series is affiliated with the International Australian Studies Association (www.inasa.org).

New Disciplinary Perspectives on Education

Series Editors: Jones Irwin and Stephen Cowden

Educational theory has always been framed within a wider context including philosophy, psychology, sociology and history. In the last ten years, educational discourse has been characterized by the emergence of a more managerialist paradigm and increased emphasis on the delivery of particular educational ‘outcomes’. This has taken place in the context of the huge expansion of tertiary education from the national level, a process in which education has come to be understood as a lucrative global commodity. But alongside these developments, there has also been a resurgence of interest in the educational insights provided by the disciplines of education: for example, renewed emphasis on enquiry-based approaches to learning (Dewey), social constructivist pedagogy (Vygotsky), educational critique (Bourdieu, Freire), new inter-religious pedagogies (Grimmit, Jackson) and fresh perspectives on the ‘spiral’ curriculum (Bruner). Much of this work takes the form of a critique of the instrumentalism of outcome-driven approaches. As the debt-laden student emerges as a political subject, educational discourse has come to represent a particularly contested terrain.

The book series New Disciplinary Perspectives on Education seeks to explore how these debates within the resurgence of the disciplines of education relate to wider political and economic conditions, creating new critical understandings and possibilities within educational theory and practice. It welcomes both theoretical and empirical studies, alongside mixed-methods approaches, and publishes disciplinary studies within philosophy, psychology, sociology and history as well as encouraging cross-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary work.

Spanish Golden Age Studies

Series Editor: Duncan Wheeler

This series publishes titles on the Golden Age, including but not limited to studies on the New World, the imperial wars, internal strife, visual arts, the popular theatre and prose fiction. Our remit is to provide an outlet for new socio-historical and cultural research on the Early Modern period, a time when Spain could for the first and last time lay claim to being the world’s leading military, economic and political power. The series is particularly interested in reflections on how cultural production both reflected and shaped the age that ostensibly brought it forth. We welcome both monographs and edited collections in English or Spanish.

Transnational Cultures

Series Editors: Dorothy Price, Madhu Krishnan and Rhian Atkin

Transnational Cultures promotes enquiry into the cultural products of transnationalism with a particular focus on the visual arts, literature, music, performance, cinema and new media. With the growth of diasporic communities, migratory crossings and virtual exchange, cultural production beyond, across and traversing borders has become an increasing focus of scholarship within historical, contemporary and comparative contexts. Concepts of nationhood are increasingly understood as a limiting and limited way of understanding culture, as artists, writers, filmmakers and intellectuals produce multilingual or translingual texts, collaborate and communicate across national borders, and redefine and reject the national in favour of the global and/or the postnational.

This series encourages new work that investigates how a transnational lens might transform existing understandings of art and culture produced in any period or location. What broader flows of knowledge, capital and power mark the cultural crossings that appear and reappear in pre-modern, modern and contemporary social formations? How do the cultural products of transnationalism trouble existing narratives of the nation-state? How do transnational cultures interact with and become absorbed by local, indigenous and national narratives? Topics may include the production and consumption of culture across borders; mutual exchange of ideas, objects and practices as a result of exile, migration and displacement; the role of social media, vlogging, reality television and digital gaming in transnational dialogue. The series strives to offer a renewed understanding of the networks of cultural exchange, transmission and translation that have helped to produce and disseminate aesthetic ideas across different continents and centuries.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections are welcome. All proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed. The main language of publication is English.

Editorial Advisory Board: Shakuntala Banaji (London School of Economics), Helena Buescu (Lisboa), Deborah Cherry (TrAIN, London), Harry Garuba (Cape Town), Richard Hibbitt (Leeds), Maria Koundoura (Emerson), Vijay Kumar Tadakamalla (Osmania, India), Bénédicte Ledent (Liège), Su Lin Lewis (Bristol), Oiyan Liu (Hong Kong), Churnjeet Mahn (Surrey), Jacqueline Maingard (Bristol), Ulrika Maude (Bristol), Stephen Morton (Southampton), Christopher Ouma (Cape Town), James Procter (Newcastle), Mark Sabine (Nottingham), Lisa Shaw (Liverpool), Siobhán Shilton (Bristol), Catherine Speck (Adelaide), Toshio Watanabe (TrAIN, London), Adam Watt (Exeter)

For information about submitting a proposal to these series, please contact oxford@peterlang.com.

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