Film Studies

New series!

Documentary Film Cultures

Series Editors: Dafydd Sills-Jones and Pietari Kääpä

This series provides a space for exploring the development of documentary film cultures in the contemporary context. The series takes an ecological approach to the study of documentary funding, production, distribution and consumption by emphasizing the interconnections between these practices and those of other media systems. It thus encourages new ways of understanding documentary films or practices as part of other, wider systems of cultural production.

Volumes may focus on specific sociopolitical environments, such as that of a nation or region. Alternatively, they may explore specific themes or production practices, such as new wave documentaries, environmentalism or indigenous film communities. Studies of shared technological platforms, including films that make use of embodied technologies or using emergent distribution platforms, are also welcome.

The series reflects not only the maturing of literature on documentary film and media production studies over the last two decades but also the growing interest amongst nonacademic and professional audiences in documentary texts as they occupy an increasingly hybrid cultural space: part journalism, part art cinema, part activism, part entertainment, part digital culture.

Editorial Board: John Corner (Liverpool University, UK), Yingchi Chu (Murdoch University, Australia), Jonathan Dovey (University of the West of England, Bristol), Susanna Helke (Aalto University, Finland), Anette Hill (Lund University, Sweden), Bert Hogenkamp (Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision), Ilona Hongisto (Macquarie University, Australia), K. P. Jayasankar (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, India), Susan Kerrigan (Newcastle University, Australia), Richard Kilborn (University of Stirling), Erik Knudsen (University of Central Lancashire, UK), David MacDougall (Australian National University), Anjali Monteiro (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai), Pablo Piedras (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina), Agnieszka Piotrowska (University of Bedfordshire, UK), Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork, Ireland), Belinda Smaill (Monash University, Australia), Inge Sorensen (University of Glasgow, UK), Bjørn Sørenssen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway), Malin Walhberg (Stockholm University, Sweden), Deane Williams (Monash University, Australia), Yingjin Zhang (UC San Diego, USA)

New Studies in European Cinema

Series Editors: Wendy Everett and Fiona Handyside

With its focus on new critical, theoretical, and cultural developments in contemporary film studies, this series encourages lively analytical debate within an innovative, multidisciplinary, and transnational approach to European cinema. It aims to create an expansive sense of where the borders of European cinema may lie and to explore its interactions and exchanges within and between regional and national spaces, taking into account diverse audiences and institutions. The series reflects the range and depth of European cinema, while also attempting to revise and extend its importance within the development of cinema studies in the coming decades. Of particular interest is how European cinema may respond to the challenges of digital distribution and the new intermedial landscape, evolving issues in transnational funding and production, the significance of film festival culture, and questions of multivocality and pluralism at a time of global crisis. The impact of all such developments upon European culture and identity will be of fundamental interest in the coming decades and the New Studies in European Cinema series makes a key contribution to this debate.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections are welcome. All proposals and manuscripts undergo a rigorous peer review assessment prior to publication.

World Science Fiction Studies

Series Editor: Sonja Fritzsche, Michigan State University

The book series World Science Fiction Studies understands science fiction to be a global phenomenon and explores the various manifestations of the genre in cultures around the world. It recognizes the importance of Anglo-American contributions to the field but promotes the critical study of science fiction in other national traditions, particularly German-speaking. It also supports the investigation of transnational discourses that have shaped the science fiction tradition since its inception. The scope of the series is not limited to one particular medium and encourages study of the genre in both print and digital forms (e.g. literature, film, television, transmedial). Theoretical approaches (e.g. post-human, gender, genre theory) and genre studies (e.g. film shorts, transgenre such as science fiction comedy) with a focus beyond the Anglo-American tradition are also welcome.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections in either English or German are invited.

Contemporary German Writers and Filmmakers

Series Editors: Julian Preece and Frank Finlay

Contemporary German Writers and Filmmakers aims to reflect the continuing and dynamic developments in German culture since the reunification of Germany in 1990. The fall of communism, the forging of the new Berlin Republic and increasing ethnic diversity have coincided with growing international acclaim for writers of German (such as Nobel Laureates Günter Grass, Elfriede Jelinek and Herta Müller) and renewed interest in German cinema (such as award-winning film Das Leben der Anderen / The Lives of Others).Each volume is devoted to the work of a contemporary German-speaking novelist, poet, playwright or filmmaker, containing an interview with its subject and, in the case of writers, an original piece of previously unpublished writing presented in parallel English translation. The other chapters on key aspects of the emerging oeuvre and its international significance are by scholars in the field. As the volumes are intended for readers with little or no knowledge of German, all quotations are translated into English. The volumes are designed as a resource for specialists and students alike and to stimulate debate within and beyond the academy.Proposals for new volumes on significant contemporary practitioners in the literary and cinematic fields are welcomed. The language of the series is English.

Italian Modernities

Series Editors: Pierpaolo Antonello and Robert S.C. Gordon

The series aims to publish innovative research on the written, material and visual cultures and intellectual history of modern Italy, from the 19th century to the present day. It is open to a wide variety of different approaches and methodologies, disciplines and interdisciplinary fields: from literary criticism and comparative literature to archival history, from cultural studies to material culture, from film and media studies to art history. It is especially interested in work which articulates aspects of Italy’s particular, and in many respects, peculiar, interactions with notions of modernity and postmodernity, broadly understood. It also aims to encourage critical dialogue between new developments in scholarship in Italy and in the English-speaking world.

Modern French Identities

Series Editor: Peter Collier

This series aims to publish monographs, editions or collections of papers based on recent research into modern French Literature. It welcomes contributions from academics, researchers and writers in British and Irish universities in particular. Modern French Identities focuses on the French and Francophone writing of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, whose formal experiments and revisions of genre have combined to create an entirely new set of literary forms, from the thematic autobiographies of Michel Leiris and Bernard Noël to the magic realism of French Caribbean writers. The idea that identities are constructed rather than found, and that the self is an area to explore rather than a given pretext, runs through much of modern French literature, from Proust, Gide and Apollinaire to Kristeva, Barthes, Duras, Germain and Roubaud. This series reflects a concern to explore the turn-of-the century turmoil in ideas and values that is expressed in the works of theorists like Lacan, Irigaray and Bourdieu and to follow through the impact of current ideologies such as feminism and postmodernism on the literary and cultural interpretation and presentation of the self, whether in terms of psychoanalytic theory, gender, autobiography, cinema, fiction and poetry, or in newer forms like performance art. The series publishes studies of individual authors and artists, comparative studies, and interdisciplinary projects, including those where art and cinema intersect with literature.

Reimagining Ireland

Series Editor: Eamon Maher

The concepts of Ireland and ‘Irishness’ are in constant flux in the wake of an ever-increasing reappraisal of the notion of cultural and national specificity in a world assailed from all angles by the forces of globalisation and uniformity. Reimagining Ireland interrogates Ireland’s past and present and suggests possibilities for the future by looking at Ireland’s literature, culture and history and subjecting them to the most up-to-date critical appraisals associated with sociology, literary theory, historiography, political science and theology.

Some of the pertinent issues include, but are not confined to, Irish writing in English and Irish, Nationalism, Unionism, the Northern ‘Troubles’, the Peace Process, economic development in Ireland, the impact and decline of the Celtic Tiger, Irish spirituality, the rise and fall of organised religion, the visual arts, popular cultures, sport, Irish music and dance, emigration and the Irish diaspora, immigration and multiculturalism, marginalisation, globalisation, modernity/postmodernity and postcolonialism.

The series publishes monographs, comparative studies, interdisciplinary projects, conference proceedings and edited books.

Studies in the History and Culture of Scotland

Series Editor: Valentina Bold

This series presents a new reading of Scottish culture, establishing how Scots, and non-Scots, experience this newly devolved nation. Within the context of a rapidly changing United Kingdom and Europe, Scotland is engaged in an ongoing process of self-definition. The series will deal with this process as well as with cultural phenomena, from debates about the relative value of Gaelic-based, Scots and Anglicised culture, to period-specific definitions of Scottish identity. Orally transmitted culture – from traditional narratives to songs, customs, beliefs and material culture – will be a key consideration, along with the reconstruction of historical periods in cultural texts (visual and musical as well as historical). Taken as a whole, the series will go some way towards achieving a new understanding of a country with potential for development into parallel treatments of locally based cultural phenomena. The series welcomes monographs as well as collected papers.

 

For more information about submitting proposals to these series, please contact oxford@peterlang.com.

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