New paperback edition available: Napoleon’s Other War

«A brilliantly written and highly original contribution to a neglected but crucial aspect of Napoleonic Europe.» (Professor T.C.W. Blanning, University of Cambridge) «Michael Broers demonstrates in this lively and entertaining book that Napoleon’s ‘other war’ against draft dodgers, deserters, bandits and guerrilla insurgents shaped Europe and the world as powerfully as conventional warfare ever did. … Continue reading

When Novels Perform History published

«The dramatic dichotomies of immersion vs estrangement provide the hermeneutic framework for this innovative take on recent Australian and Canadian fiction’s engagement with history. Theoretically sophisticated and meticulously researched, When Novels Perform History studies the performative/theatrical modes deployed in well-selected examples of postcolonial historical fiction, offering ways to challenge national myths while telling (or, rather, … Continue reading

Photos from the book launch: Writing the Great War

Nicolas Bianchi and Toby Garfitt’s edited collection Writing the Great War / Comment écrire la Grande Guerre? was launched in the Common Room, History Faculty at the University of Oxford on Tuesday 28 November at 5.30 pm. The launch took place during the drinks reception to follow Professor John Horne’s valedictory Leverhulme lecture ‘War as … Continue reading

The Real Meaning of our Work? published

Youth clubs like the Boys’ Brigade became a trend in the UK in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Jewish community in the UK began their own clubs to educate and entertain young Jews. These clubs mirrored the examples begun within the Christian community and adapted their models of social control by providing … Continue reading

Albert Einstein: The Roads to Pacifism published

Albert Einstein (1879–1955) is universally known as the father of the theory of relativity; however, he was also one of the most eminent pacifists of the first half of the twentieth century. Through his active, pragmatic and nuanced breed of pacifism, he sought to confront the dilemmas and problems stemming from the unstable political conditions … Continue reading

Privatizing Democracy published

Democratization is a process of collective emancipation through self-government. Continuous political contestation is essential for emancipation but, in order to know which strategies and conditions will emancipate us, we also need to know which ones subjugate us. Political mechanisms with the capacity to modulate our individual and collective bodies and make them docile tend to … Continue reading

This Favoured Land published

In the wake of the Irish potato famine, Edward King-Tenison, a sometime Irish politician of the liberal order and one of the first masterful photographers of Spain, and his wife, Lady Louisa Mary Anne Anson, the eldest daughter of the 1st Earl of Lichfield, left their estate of Kilronan in County Roscommon, Ireland, to reside … Continue reading

Football, Ethnicity and Community shortlisted for the Lord Aberdare Literary Prize

Peter Lang is pleased to announce that Football, Ethnicity and Community: The Life of an African-Caribbean Football Club by Paul Ian Campbell has been shortlisted for the Lord Aberdare Literary Prize. We congratulate our author! More information on the title can be found here. The book has previously been named the winner of the British … Continue reading

Paul Campbell interviewed on @BBCRadio4 ‘Thinking Allowed’

Paul Ian Campbell, winner of the British Sociological Association Philip Abrams Memorial Prize for his book Football, Ethnicity and Community: The Life of an African-Caribbean Football Club, was interviewed about his research on @BBCRadio4 ‘Thinking Allowed’ in a broadcast on ‘Sport and Philosophy – Inside an African-Caribbean Football Club’. Click here to listen to the … Continue reading

Writing the Great War / Comment écrire la Grande Guerre? published

For France the First World War, or Great War, was a war of national self-defence, but for Britain it was not. Does that mean that French literary treatments of this unimaginably destructive war were very different from British ones? Not necessarily – but much can be learned from considering both traditions side by side, something … Continue reading

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