Imperial Infrastructure and Spatial Resistance in Colonial Literature, 1880–1930 published

Between 1880 and 1930, the British Empire’s vast infrastructural developments facilitated the incorporation of large parts of the globe into not only its imperial rule, but also the capitalist world-system. Throughout this period, colonial literary fiction, in recording this vast expansion, repeatedly cited these imperial infrastructures to make sense of the various colonial landscapes in … Continue reading

Memories of the Future published

«Everywhere the crisis speeds toward places and people that have long kept the disasters they produced far away and for others. Across a series of groundbreaking essays, Memories of the Future sets into play a debate among scholars and artists about the politics of the future present. This collection refuses to offer an answer. It … Continue reading

InHabit launched @TORCHOxford

InHabit: People, Places and Possessions, edited by Antony Buxton, Linda Hulin and Jane Anderson, was launched on 3 May 2017 at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities  (TORCH). It was featured as part of the Centre’s fortnightly book discussion ‘Book at Lunchtime’. The event was chaired by Elleke Boehmer, Director of TORCH and Professor of World … Continue reading

Book launch: Inhabit: People, Places and Possessions

InHabit: People, Places and Possessions, edited by Antony Buxton, Linda Hulin and Jane Anderson, will be launched on 3 May 2017 at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities  (TORCH). It will be featured as part of the Centre’s fortnightly book discussion ‘Book at Lunchtime’. The volume editors will be joined by: Dr Cathy Oakes (History of … Continue reading

Becoming Vampire published

Becoming Vampire is an interdisciplinary study of how the figure of the vampire in the twenty-first century has been used to create and define difference, not as either a positive or negative attribute, but as a catalyst for change and the exploration of new identity positions. Whilst focusing on the films Let Me In and … Continue reading

InHabit: People, Places and Possessions published

Central to human life and experience, habitation forms a context for enquiry within many disciplines. This collection brings together perspectives on human habitation in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, social history, material culture, literature, art and design, and architecture. Significant shared themes are the physical and social structuring of space, practice and agency, consumption and … Continue reading

Peter Lang attending MeCCSA in January

Peter Lang will be attending MeCCSA this January, and Lucy Melville, Publishing Director, would be delighted to hear from scholars looking to place their work in one of our series, or as standalone monographs and collected editions. She is now coordinating appointments and would be glad to hear from you. Alternatively, please come by the … Continue reading

Irish Studies and the Dynamics of Memory published

Irish Studies and the Dynamics of Memory presents the latest research from Irish studies scholars across a variety of disciplines, including history, literature, theatre, photography and folklore, and generates new and challenging insights into the dynamics of cultural remembrance in Irish society. Featuring contributions by leading researchers in the field such as Guy Beiner, Graham … Continue reading

Cold War Cities published

The Cold War left indelible traces on the city, where polarities on the global stage crystallized and intersected with political and social dynamics predating and bypassing the Blocs. This collection taps into the rich fabric of memories, histories and cultural interactions of thirteen cities worldwide and the lived experience of urban communities during the long … Continue reading

The Colours of the Past in Victorian England published

The experience of colour underwent a significant change in the second half of the nineteenth century, as new coal tar-based synthetic dyes were devised for the expanding textile industry. These new, artificial colours were often despised in artistic circles who favoured ancient and more authentic forms of polychromy, whether antique, medieval, Renaissance or Japanese. However … Continue reading

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Oxford International Art Fair 2017 - Oxford Town Hall