Cultural Studies

New Series!

Imagining Black Europe

Series Editors: Tiffany N. Florvil and Vanessa D. Plumly

This series seeks to publish critical and nuanced scholarship in the field of Black European Studies. Moving beyond and building on the Black Atlantic approach, books in this series will underscore the existence, diversity and evolution of Black Europe. They will provide historical, intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives on how Black diasporic peoples have reconfigured the boundaries of Black identity making, claim making and politics; created counterdiscourses and counterpublics on race, colonialism, postcolonialism and racism; and forged transnational connections and solidarities across Europe and the globe. The series will also illustrate the ways that Black European diasporic peoples have employed intellectual, socio-political, artistic/cultural, affective, digital and pedagogical work to aid their communities and causes, challenge their exclusion and cultivate ties with their allies, thus gaining recognition in their societies and beyond.

Representing the field’s dynamic growth methodologically, geographically and culturally, the series will also collectively interrogate notions of Blackness, Black diasporic culture and Europeanness while also challenging the boundaries of Europe. Books in the series will critically examine how race and ethnicity intersect with the themes of gender, nationality, class, religion, politics, kinship, sexuality, affect and the transnational, offering comparative and international perspectives. One of the main goals of the series is to introduce and produce rigorous academic research that connects not only with individuals in academia but also with a broader public.

Areas of interest:

  • Social movements
  • Racial discourses and politics
  • Empire, slavery and colonialism
  • Decolonialization and postcolonialism
  • Gender, sexuality and intersectionality
  • Black activism (in all its forms)
  • Racial and political violence and surveillance
  • Racial constructions
  • Diasporic practices
  • Race and racialization in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary eras
  • Identity, representation and cultural productions (music, art, literature, etc.)
  • Memory
  • Migration and immigration
  • Citizenship
  • State building and diplomacy
  • Nations and nationalisms

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

Advisory Board: Hakim Adi (Chichester), Robbie Aitken (Sheffield Hallam), Catherine Baker (Hull), Eddie Bruce-Jones (Birkbeck), Alessandra Di Maio (Palermo), Akwugo Emejulu (Warwick), Philomena Essed (Antioch), Crystal Fleming (Stony Brook), David Theo Goldberg (UC Irvine), Silke Hackenesch (Cologne), Elahe Haschemi Yekani (Humboldt), Nicholas Jones (Bucknell), Silyane Larcher (CNRS), Olivette Otele (Bath Spa), Sue Peabody (Washington State), Kennetta Perry (De Montfort), Cassander L. Smith (Alabama), S. A. Smythe (UCLA)

 

New Series!

Disability, Media, Culture

Series Editors: Alison Wilde and Murray Simpson

Globally today, television, film and the internet comprise the principal sources of cultural consumption and engagement. Despite this, these areas have not featured strongly in the cultural study of disability. This book series will provide the first specific outlet for international scholars of disability to present their work on these topics.

The series will build a body of work that brings together critical analysis of disability and impairments in media and culture. The series expands the work currently undertaken in literary studies on disability by using media and cultural theory to understand the place of disability and impairment in a range of media and cultural forms.

The series encourages the development of work on disabled people in the media, within the media industries and in the wider cultural sphere. Whilst film and television analysis will be central to this series, we also encourage work on disability in other media, including journalism, radio, the internet and gaming.

We welcome proposals from media studies: narrative constructions of disability; technical aspects of media production; disability, the economy and society; the impact of social media and gaming on disabled identities; and the role of architecture and image. Cultural studies are also encouraged: the uses of disabled and chronically ill bodies, ‘cripping culture’, corporeal projections in culture, intersectional identities, advertising, and the uses of cultural theory in furthering understandings of ableism and disablism.

All proposals and manuscripts will be rigorously peer reviewed. The language of publication is English, although we welcome submissions from around the world and on topics that may take as their focus non-English media. We welcome new proposals for monographs and edited collections.

New Series!

The City as Place: Emotions, Experiences, and Meanings

Series Editors: Rebecca Madgin and Nicolas Kenny

The purpose of this series is to examine the city as a lived place. Specifically, we are interested in the ways in which the city is invested with meaning through everyday lived experiences. The series is particularly interested in submissions that focus on the perceptual and felt dimensions of urban places through exploring the experiential, emotional, sensory, and affective dimensions that contribute to how people behave in, feel about, and move around in cities. Books in this series will interrogate the relationship between people and place through a focus on the diverse ways in which subjective and intimate feelings are fundamental constituents of the urban experience. We encourage authors to examine the city as a lived place from a range of different perspectives, and to be inclusive of individual and collective voices in the city to better understand the historical development and contemporary evolution of diverse urban settings.

Some of the questions we seek to explore through the series include, but are not restricted to:

  • How is the city experienced, by whom, and how does this change over time?
  • Who shapes the experience of the city and for what reasons?
  • How do individual and shared joy, fear, pride, nostalgia, disgust, or other emotions, shape the meanings attributed to urban spaces?
  • How does the lived experience of, and emotional connections to, urban places inform the way particular spaces within cities are preserved and memorialized, or alternatively demolished and redeveloped?
  • In what ways is our understanding of the lived experience of the city sharpened through the lens of comparative, transnational, and global approaches?

The series seeks to examine the real and the imaginary, the representational and the non-representational, the historical and the contemporary, the remembered and the recreated in all historical periods including research on the twenty-first century city. The series is open to work covering all geographic areas, and we encourage authors, where possible and relevant, to situate their studies in comparative, transnational, or global perspectives. Books may be published in English or in French.

New Series!

Genre Fiction and Film Companions

Series Editor: Simon Bacon

The Genre Fiction and Film Companions provide accessible introductions to key texts within the most popular genres of our time. Written by leading scholars in the field, brief essays on individual texts offer innovative ways of understanding, interpreting and reading. Invaluable for students, teachers and fans alike, these surveys offer new insights into the most important literary works, films, music, events and more within genre fiction and film.

New Series!

Medical Humanities: Criticism and Creativity

Series Editors: Maria Vaccarella and Kimberly R. Myers

This series showcases innovative research, creativity and pedagogy in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Books in the series explore the complexities of human bodies, minds, illness and wellbeing through analytical frameworks derived from humanistic disciplines and clinical practice. The series is intended to provide an informative exchange across disciplines, contributing to debates on health-related issues from a broad range of perspectives. In addition to research monographs and edited collections, the series includes creative works as well as pedagogical texts, thus encouraging personal and theoretical reflections on the condition of the human mind/body. The series embraces the intersection of healthcare and the humanities, in its practical, theoretical, creative and educational expressions.

The series serves as a venue for publishing a range of materials: research monographs and edited collections on critical approaches to medical issues in culture; creative works that engage with medical humanities themes, accompanied by critical and educational materials; and critical, engaged or radical pedagogies on focused topics and/or for learners in the medical humanities. The series also invites research that opens up critical conversations on being human at the intersection of other forms of new humanistic knowledge, such as environmental or digital humanities. We are especially interested in collaborations between academics in the humanities and healthcare professionals.

All book proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed prior to publication. We publish in both print and electronic format. Open Access publication is particularly welcome.

Australian Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Series Editor: Anne Brewster

This interdisciplinary book series showcases dynamic, innovative research on contemporary and historical Australian culture. It aims to foster interventions in established debates on Australia as well as opening up new areas of enquiry that reflect the diversity of interests in the scholarly community. The series includes research in a range of fields across the humanities and social sciences, such as history, literature, media, philosophy, cultural studies, gender studies and politics. Proposals are encouraged in areas such as Indigenous studies, critical race and whiteness studies, women’s studies, studies in colonialism and coloniality, multiculturalism, the experimental humanities and ecocriticism. Of particular interest is research that promotes the study of Australia in cross-cultural, transnational and comparative contexts. Cross-disciplinarity and new methodologies are welcomed.

The series will feature the work of leading authors but also invites proposals from emerging scholars. Proposals for monographs and high-quality edited volumes are welcomed. Proposals and manuscripts considered for the series will be subject to rigorous peer review and editorial attention. The series is affiliated with the International Australian Studies Association (www.inasa.org).

Transnational Cultures

Series Editors: Dorothy Price, Madhu Krishnan and Rhian Atkin

Transnational Cultures promotes enquiry into the cultural products of transnationalism with a particular focus on the visual arts, literature, music, performance, cinema and new media. With the growth of diasporic communities, migratory crossings and virtual exchange, cultural production beyond, across and traversing borders has become an increasing focus of scholarship within historical, contemporary and comparative contexts. Concepts of nationhood are increasingly understood as a limiting and limited way of understanding culture, as artists, writers, filmmakers and intellectuals produce multilingual or translingual texts, collaborate and communicate across national borders, and redefine and reject the national in favour of the global and/or the postnational.

This series encourages new work that investigates how a transnational lens might transform existing understandings of art and culture produced in any period or location. What broader flows of knowledge, capital and power mark the cultural crossings that appear and reappear in pre-modern, modern and contemporary social formations? How do the cultural products of transnationalism trouble existing narratives of the nation-state? How do transnational cultures interact with and become absorbed by local, indigenous and national narratives? Topics may include the production and consumption of culture across borders; mutual exchange of ideas, objects and practices as a result of exile, migration and displacement; the role of social media, vlogging, reality television and digital gaming in transnational dialogue. The series strives to offer a renewed understanding of the networks of cultural exchange, transmission and translation that have helped to produce and disseminate aesthetic ideas across different continents and centuries.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections are welcome. All proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed. The main language of publication is English.

Editorial Advisory Board: Shakuntala Banaji (London School of Economics), Helena Buescu (Lisboa), Deborah Cherry (TrAIN, London), Harry Garuba (Cape Town), Richard Hibbitt (Leeds), Maria Koundoura (Emerson), Vijay Kumar Tadakamalla (Osmania, India), Bénédicte Ledent (Liège), Su Lin Lewis (Bristol), Oiyan Liu (Hong Kong), Churnjeet Mahn (Surrey), Jacqueline Maingard (Bristol), Ulrika Maude (Bristol), Stephen Morton (Southampton), Christopher Ouma (Cape Town), James Procter (Newcastle), Mark Sabine (Nottingham), Lisa Shaw (Liverpool), Siobhán Shilton (Bristol), Catherine Speck (Adelaide), Toshio Watanabe (TrAIN, London), Adam Watt (Exeter)

Race and Resistance Across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century

Series Editors: Tessa Roynon, Elleke Boehmer, Victoria Collis-Buthelezi, Patricia Daley, Aaron Kamugisha, Minkah Makalani, Hélène Neveu Kringelbach and Stephen Tuck

This series focuses on the history and culture of activists, artists and intellectuals who have worked within and against racially oppressive hierarchies in the first half of the twentieth century and beyond, and who have then sought to define and to achieve full equality once those formal hierarchies have been overturned. It explores the ways in which such individuals –- writers, scholars, campaigners and organizers, ministers, and artists and performers of all kinds -– located their resistance within a global context and forged connections with each other across national, linguistic, regional and imperial borders.

Disseminating the latest interdisciplinary scholarship on the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Asia and Latin America, the series foregrounds, through a cross-disciplinary approach, the transnational and intercultural nature of these resistance movements. The series embraces a range of themes, including but not limited to antislavery, intellectual and literary networks, emigration and immigration, anti-imperialism, church-based and religious movements, civil rights, citizenship and identity, Black Power, resistance strategies, women’s movements, cultural transfer, white supremacy and anti-immigration, hip hop and global justice movements.

The series is affiliated with the Race and Resistance Research Programme at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), University of Oxford. Proposals are invited for sole- and joint-authored monographs as well as edited collections.

Editorial Advisory Board:
Funmi Adewole (DeMontfort University), Joan Anim-Addo (Goldsmiths, University of London), Celeste-Marie Bernier (University of Edinburgh), Alan Cobley (University of the West Indies, Cave Hill), Carolyn Cooper (University of the West Indies, Mona), Zaire Dinzey-Flores (Rutgers, State University of New Jersey), Tanisha Ford (University of Delaware), Maryemma Graham (University of Kansas), Christopher J. Lee (Lafayette College), Justine McConnell (King’s College London), Pap Ndiaye (Sciences Po), David Scott (Columbia University), Hortense Spillers (Vanderbilt University), Imaobong Umoren (University of Oxford), Harvey Young (Northwestern University)

World Science Fiction Studies

Series Editors: Sonja Fritzsche and Gerry Canavan

The book series World Science Fiction Studies understands science fiction to be a global phenomenon and explores the various manifestations of the genre in cultures around the world. It recognizes the importance of Anglo-American contributions to the field but promotes the critical study of science fiction in other national traditions, particularly German-speaking. It also supports the investigation of transnational discourses that have shaped the science fiction tradition since its inception. The scope of the series is not limited to one particular medium and encourages study of the genre in both print and digital forms (e.g. literature, film, television, transmedial). Theoretical approaches (e.g. post-human, gender, genre theory) and genre studies (e.g. film shorts, transgenre such as science fiction comedy) with a focus beyond the Anglo-American tradition are also welcome.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections in either English or German are invited.

British Identities since 1707

Series Editors: Paul Ward and Richard Finlay

The historiography of British identities has flourished since the mid-1970s, spurred an by increasing national consciousness in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and since 1997 by devolution. Historians and other academics have become increasingly aware that identities in the British Isles have been fluid and that interactions between the different parts of the British Isles have been central to historical developments since, and indeed before, the Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707.

This series seeks to encourage exploration of identities of place in the British Isles since the early eighteenth century, including intersections between competing and complementary identities such as region and nation. The series also advances discussion of other identities such as class, gender, religion, politics, ethnicity and culture when these are geographically located and positioned. While the series is historical, it welcomes cross- and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of British identities.

British Identities since 1707 examines the unity and diversity of the British Isles, developing consideration of the multiplicity of negotiations that have taken place in such a multinational and multi-ethnic group of Islands. lt will include discussions of nationalism(s), of Britishness, Englishness, Scattishness, Welshness and Irishness, as well as ‘regional’ identities including, for example, those associated with Cornwall, the Gäidhealtachd region in Scotland and Gaeltacht areas in Ireland. The series will encompass discussions of relations with continental Europe and the United States, with ethnic and immigrant identities and with other forms of identity associated with the British Isles as place. The editors are interested in publishing books relating to the wider British world, including current and former parts of the British Empire and the Commonwealth, and places such as Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands and the smaller islands of the British archipelago. British Identities since 1707 reinforces the consideration of history, culture and politics as richly diverse across and within the borders of the British Isles.

Cultural History and Literary Imagination

Series Editors: Christian J. Emden and David Midgley

This series promotes critical inquiry into the relationship between the literary imagination and its cultural, intellectual or political contexts. The series encourages the investigation of the role of the literary imagination in cultural history and the interpretation of cultural history through literature, visual culture and the performing arts.

Contributions of a comparative or interdisciplinary nature are particularly welcome. Individual volumes might, for example, be concerned with any of the following:

  • The mediation of cultural and historical memory,
  • The material conditions of particular cultural manifestations,
  • The construction of cultural and political meaning,
  • Intellectual culture and the impact of scientific thought,
  • The methodology of cultural inquiry,
  • Intermediality,
  • Intercultural relations and practices.

Acceptance is subject to advice from our editorial board, and all proposals and manuscripts undergo a rigorous peer review assessment prior to publication. The usual language of publication is English, but proposals in French, German, Italian and Spanish may also be considered.

Editorial Board: Rodrigo Cacho, University of Cambridge; Sarah Colvin, University of Cambridge; Kenneth Loiselle, Trinity University; Heather Webb, University of Cambridge.

Cultural Identity Studies

Series Editors: Carmen Zamorano Llena, Billy Gray and Jonas Stier

This series publishes new research into relationships and interactions between culture and identity, broadly conceived. Studies relating to intercultural or transcultural identities are particularly welcome, as the series is the publishing project of the Intercultural Studies research group at Dalarna University, Sweden. The series embraces research into the roles of linguistic, social, political, psychological, literary, audiovisual, religious and/or cultural aspects in the processes of individual and collective identity formation. Given the nature of the field, interdisciplinary and theoretically diverse approaches are encouraged. Work on the theorizing of cultural aspects of identity formation and case studies of individual writers, thinkers and/or cultural products will be included. The series welcomes intercultural, transcultural and transnational links and comparisons worldwide.

Cultural Interactions: Studies in the Relationship between the Arts

Series Editor: J.B. Bullen

Interdisciplinary activity is now a major feature of academic work in all fields. The traditional borders between the arts have been eroded to reveal new connections and create new links between art forms. Cultural Interactions is intended to provide a forum for this activity. It will publish monographs, edited collections and volumes of primary material on points of crossover such as those between literature and the visual arts or photography and fiction, music and theatre, sculpture and historiography. It will engage with book illustration, the manipulation of typography as an art form, or the ‘double work’ of poetry and painting and will offer the opportunity to broaden the field into wider and less charted areas. It will deal with modes of representation that cross the physiological boundaries of sight, hearing and touch and examine the placing of these modes within their representative cultures. It will offer an opportunity to publish on the crosscurrents of nationality and the transformations brought about by foreign art forms impinging upon others. The interface between the arts knows no boundaries of time or geography, history or theory.

Cultural Memories

Series Editor: Katia Pizzi

Cultural Memories is the publishing project of the Centre for the Study of Cultural Memory at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, University of London. The Centre is international in scope and promotes innovative research with a focus on interdisciplinary approaches to memory.
This series supports the Centre by furthering original research in the global field of cultural memory studies. In particular, it seeks to challenge a monumentalizing model of memory in favour of a more fluid and heterogeneous one, where history, culture and memory are seen as complementary and intersecting. The series embraces new methodological approaches, encompassing a wide range of technologies of memory in cognate fields, including comparative studies, cultural studies, history, literature, media and communication, and cognitive science. The aim of Cultural Memories is to encourage and enhance research in the broad field of memory studies while, at the same time, pointing in new directions, providing a unique platform for creative and and forward-looking scholarship in the discipline.

 

Ralahine Utopian Studies

Series Editors: Raffaella Baccolini,  Joachim Fischer, Michael J. Griffin,  Michael G. Kelly and Tom Moylan

Ralahine Utopian Studies is the publishing project of the Ralahine Centre for Utopian Studies, University of Limerick, and the Department of Intercultural Studies in Translation, Languages and Culture, University of Bologna at Forlì.

The series editors aim to publish scholarship that addresses the theory and practice of utopianism (including Anglophone, continental European, and indigenous and post-colonial traditions, and contemporary and historical periods). Publications (in English and other European languages) will include original monographs and essay collections (including theoretical, textual, and ethnographic/institutional research), English language translations of utopian scholarship in other national languages, reprints of classic scholarly works that are out of print, and annotated editions of original utopian literary and other texts (including translations).

While the editors seek work that engages with the current scholarship and debates in the field of utopian studies, they will not privilege any particular critical or theoretical orientation. They welcome submissions by established or emerging scholars working within or outside the academy. Given the multi-lingual and inter-disciplinary remit of the University of Limerick and the University of Bologna at Forlì, they especially welcome comparative studies in any disciplinary or trans-disciplinary framework.

Studies in the History and Culture of Scotland

Series Editor: Valentina Bold

This series presents a new reading of Scottish culture, establishing how Scots, and non-Scots, experience this newly devolved nation. Within the context of a rapidly changing United Kingdom and Europe, Scotland is engaged in an ongoing process of self-definition. The series will deal with this process as well as with cultural phenomena, from debates about the relative value of Gaelic-based, Scots and Anglicised culture, to period-specific definitions of Scottish identity. Orally transmitted culture – from traditional narratives to songs, customs, beliefs and material culture – will be a key consideration, along with the reconstruction of historical periods in cultural texts (visual and musical as well as historical). Taken as a whole, the series will go some way towards achieving a new understanding of a country with potential for development into parallel treatments of locally based cultural phenomena. The series welcomes monographs as well as collected papers.

 

For information about submitting proposals to these series, please contact oxford@peterlang.com.

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