Cultural Studies

Australian Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Series Editor: Anne Brewster

This interdisciplinary book series showcases dynamic, innovative research on contemporary and historical Australian culture. It aims to foster interventions in established debates on Australia as well as opening up new areas of enquiry that reflect the diversity of interests in the scholarly community. The series includes research in a range of fields across the humanities and social sciences, such as history, literature, media, philosophy, cultural studies, gender studies and politics. Proposals are encouraged in areas such as Indigenous studies, critical race and whiteness studies, women’s studies, studies in colonialism and coloniality, multiculturalism, the experimental humanities and ecocriticism. Of particular interest is research that promotes the study of Australia in cross-cultural, transnational and comparative contexts. Cross-disciplinarity and new methodologies are welcomed.

The series will feature the work of leading authors but also invites proposals from emerging scholars. Proposals for monographs and high-quality edited volumes are welcomed. Proposals and manuscripts considered for the series will be subject to rigorous peer review and editorial attention. The series is affiliated with the International Australian Studies Association (www.inasa.org).

Transnational Cultures

Series Editors: Dorothy Price, Madhu Krishnan and Rhian Atkin

Transnational Cultures promotes enquiry into the cultural products of transnationalism with a particular focus on the visual arts, literature, music, performance, cinema and new media. With the growth of diasporic communities, migratory crossings and virtual exchange, cultural production beyond, across and traversing borders has become an increasing focus of scholarship within historical, contemporary and comparative contexts. Concepts of nationhood are increasingly understood as a limiting and limited way of understanding culture, as artists, writers, filmmakers and intellectuals produce multilingual or translingual texts, collaborate and communicate across national borders, and redefine and reject the national in favour of the global and/or the postnational.

This series encourages new work that investigates how a transnational lens might transform existing understandings of art and culture produced in any period or location. What broader flows of knowledge, capital and power mark the cultural crossings that appear and reappear in pre-modern, modern and contemporary social formations? How do the cultural products of transnationalism trouble existing narratives of the nation-state? How do transnational cultures interact with and become absorbed by local, indigenous and national narratives? Topics may include the production and consumption of culture across borders; mutual exchange of ideas, objects and practices as a result of exile, migration and displacement; the role of social media, vlogging, reality television and digital gaming in transnational dialogue. The series strives to offer a renewed understanding of the networks of cultural exchange, transmission and translation that have helped to produce and disseminate aesthetic ideas across different continents and centuries.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections are welcome. All proposals and manuscripts will be peer reviewed. The main language of publication is English.

Race and Resistance Across Borders in the Long Twentieth Century

Series Editors: Tessa Roynon, Elleke Boehmer, Victoria Collis-Buthelezi, Patricia Daley, Aaron Kamugisha, Minkah Makalani, Hélène Neveu Kringelbach and Stephen Tuck

This series focuses on the history and culture of activists, artists and intellectuals who worked within and against racially oppressive hierarchies in the first half of the twentieth century, and who then sought to define and achieve full equality once those formal hierarchies had been overturned. It explores the ways in which such individuals – writers, scholars, campaigners and organizers, ministers, and artists and performers of all kinds – located their resistance within a global context and forged connections with each other across national, linguistic, regional and imperial borders.

Disseminating the latest interdisciplinary scholarship on the history, literature and culture of anti-racist movements in Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, Asia and Latin America, the series foregrounds, through a cross-disciplinary approach, the transnational and intercultural nature of these resistance movements. The series embraces a range of themes, including but not limited to antislavery, intellectual and literary networks, emigration and immigration, anti-imperialism, church-based and religious movements, civil rights, citizenship and identity, Black Power, resistance strategies, women’s movements, cultural transfer, white supremacy and anti-immigration, hip hop and global justice movements.

The series is affiliated with the Race and Resistance Research Network at the University of Oxford. Proposals are invited for sole- and joint-authored monographs as well as edited collections.

World Science Fiction Studies

Series Editor: Sonja Fritzsche, Illinois Wesleyan University

The book series World Science Fiction Studies understands science fiction to be a global phenomenon and explores the various manifestations of the genre in cultures around the world. It recognizes the importance of Anglo-American contributions to the field but promotes the critical study of science fiction in other national traditions, particularly German-speaking. It also supports the investigation of transnational discourses that have shaped the science fiction tradition since its inception. The scope of the series is not limited to one particular medium and encourages study of the genre in both print and digital forms (e.g. literature, film, television, transmedial). Theoretical approaches (e.g. post-human, gender, genre theory) and genre studies (e.g. film shorts, transgenre such as science fiction comedy) with a focus beyond the Anglo-American tradition are also welcome.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections in either English or German are invited.

British Identities since 1707

Series Editors: Paul Ward and Richard Finlay

The historiography of British identities has flourished since the mid-1970s, spurred an by increasing national consciousness in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and since 1997 by devolution. Historians and other academics have become increasingly aware that identities in the British Isles have been fluid and that interactions between the different parts of the British Isles have been central to historical developments since, and indeed before, the Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707.

This series seeks to encourage exploration of identities of place in the British Isles since the early eighteenth century, including intersections between competing and complementary identities such as region and nation. The series also advances discussion of other identities such as class, gender, religion, politics, ethnicity and culture when these are geographically located and positioned. While the series is historical, it welcomes cross- and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of British identities.

British Identities since 1707 examines the unity and diversity of the British Isles, developing consideration of the multiplicity of negotiations that have taken place in such a multinational and multi-ethnic group of Islands. lt will include discussions of nationalism(s), of Britishness, Englishness, Scattishness, Welshness and Irishness, as well as ‘regional’ identities including, for example, those associated with Cornwall, the Gäidhealtachd region in Scotland and Gaeltacht areas in Ireland. The series will encompass discussions of relations with continental Europe and the United States, with ethnic and immigrant identities and with other forms of identity associated with the British Isles as place. The editors are interested in publishing books relating to the wider British world, including current and former parts of the British Empire and the Commonwealth, and places such as Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands and the smaller islands of the British archipelago. British Identities since 1707 reinforces the consideration of history, culture and politics as richly diverse across and within the borders of the British Isles.

Cultural History and Literary Imagination

Series Editors: Christian Emden and David Midgley

This series promotes inquiry into the relationship between literary texts and their cultural and intellectual contexts, in theoretical, interpretative and historical perspectives. It has developed out of a research initiative of the German Department at Cambridge University, but its focus of interest is on the European tradition broadly perceived. Its purpose is to encourage comparative and interdisciplinary research into the connections between cultural history and the literary imagination generally.

The editors are especially concerned to encourage the investigation of the role of the literary imagination in cultural history and the interpretation of cultural history through the literary text. Examples of the kind of issues in which they are particularly interested include the following:

The material conditions of culture and their representation in literature, e.g. responses to the impact of the sciences, technology, and industrialisation, the confrontation of ‘high’ culture with popular culture, and the impact of new media;
The construction of cultural meaning through literary texts, e.g. responses to cultural crisis, or paradigm shifts in cultural self-perception, including the establishment of cultural ‘foundation myths’;
History and cultural memory as mediated through the metaphors and models deployed in literary writing and other media;
The intermedial and intercultural practice of authors or literary movements in specific periods;
The methodology of cultural inquiry and the theoretical discussion of such issues as intermediality, text as a medium of cultural memory, and intercultural relations.

Both theoretical reflection on and empirical investigation of these issues are welcome. The series is intended to include monographs, editions, and collections of papers based on recent research in this area. The main language of publication is English.

Cultural Identity Studies

Series Editor: Helen Chambers

This series aims to publish new research (monographs and essays) into relationships and interactions between culture and identity. The notions of both culture and identity are broadly conceived; interdisciplinary and theoretically diverse approaches are encouraged in a series designed to promote a better understanding of the processes of identity formation, both individual and collective. It will embrace research into the roles of linguistic, social, political, psychological, and religious factors, taking account of historical context. Work on the theorizing of cultural aspects of identity formation, together with case studies of individual writers, thinkers or cultural products will be included. It focuses primarily on cultures linked to European languages, but welcomes transcultural links and comparisons. It is published in association with the Institute of European Cultural Identity Studies of the University of St Andrews.

Cultural Interactions: Studies in the Relationship between the Arts

Series Editor: J.B. Bullen

Interdisciplinary activity is now a major feature of academic work in all fields. The traditional borders between the arts have been eroded to reveal new connections and create new links between art forms. Cultural Interactions is intended to provide a forum for this activity. It will publish monographs, edited collections and volumes of primary material on points of crossover such as those between literature and the visual arts or photography and fiction, music and theatre, sculpture and historiography. It will engage with book illustration, the manipulation of typography as an art form, or the ‘double work’ of poetry and painting and will offer the opportunity to broaden the field into wider and less charted areas. It will deal with modes of representation that cross the physiological boundaries of sight, hearing and touch and examine the placing of these modes within their representative cultures. It will offer an opportunity to publish on the crosscurrents of nationality and the transformations brought about by foreign art forms impinging upon others. The interface between the arts knows no boundaries of time or geography, history or theory.

Cultural Memories

Series Editor: Katia Pizzi

Cultural Memories is the publishing project of the Centre for the Study of Cultural Memory at the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, University of London. The Centre is international in scope and promotes innovative research with a focus on interdisciplinary approaches to memory.
This series supports the Centre by furthering original research in the global field of cultural memory studies. In particular, it seeks to challenge a monumentalizing model of memory in favour of a more fluid and heterogeneous one, where history, culture and memory are seen as complementary and intersecting. The series embraces new methodological approaches, encompassing a wide range of technologies of memory in cognate fields, including comparative studies, cultural studies, history, literature, media and communication, and cognitive science. The aim of Cultural Memories is to encourage and enhance research in the broad field of memory studies while, at the same time, pointing in new directions, providing a unique platform for creative and and forward-looking scholarship in the discipline.

New Studies in European Cinema

Series Editors: Wendy Everett and Axel Goodbody

With its focus on new critical, theoretical, and cultural developments in contemporary film studies, this series intends to develop rigorous analytical debate within an innovative, multidisciplinary, and transnational approach to European cinema.

Through a mixture of edited collections and single-authored volumes, the series aims both to re-evaluate established critical thought and to identify and explore new trends and theories that will inform cinema studies over the coming decades. It provides an international forum for lively and controversial debate embracing all aspects of European cinema from a broad range of theoretical perspectives. The New Studies in European Cinema series will thus make a key contribution to a subject whose importance to contemporary culture and identity is fundamental.

Ralahine Utopian Studies

Series Editors: Raffaella Baccolini,  Joachim Fischer, Michael J. Griffin,  Michael G. Kelly and Tom Moylan

Ralahine Utopian Studies is the publishing project of the Ralahine Centre for Utopian Studies, University of Limerick, and the Department of Intercultural Studies in Translation, Languages and Culture, University of Bologna at Forlì.

The series editors aim to publish scholarship that addresses the theory and practice of utopianism (including Anglophone, continental European, and indigenous and post-colonial traditions, and contemporary and historical periods). Publications (in English and other European languages) will include original monographs and essay collections (including theoretical, textual, and ethnographic/institutional research), English language translations of utopian scholarship in other national languages, reprints of classic scholarly works that are out of print, and annotated editions of original utopian literary and other texts (including translations).

While the editors seek work that engages with the current scholarship and debates in the field of utopian studies, they will not privilege any particular critical or theoretical orientation. They welcome submissions by established or emerging scholars working within or outside the academy. Given the multi-lingual and inter-disciplinary remit of the University of Limerick and the University of Bologna at Forlì, they especially welcome comparative studies in any disciplinary or trans-disciplinary framework.

Studies in the History and Culture of Scotland

Series Editor: Valentina Bold

This series presents a new reading of Scottish culture, establishing how Scots, and non-Scots, experience this newly devolved nation. Within the context of a rapidly changing United Kingdom and Europe, Scotland is engaged in an ongoing process of self-definition. The series will deal with this process as well as with cultural phenomena, from debates about the relative value of Gaelic-based, Scots and Anglicised culture, to period-specific definitions of Scottish identity. Orally transmitted culture – from traditional narratives to songs, customs, beliefs and material culture – will be a key consideration, along with the reconstruction of historical periods in cultural texts (visual and musical as well as historical). Taken as a whole, the series will go some way towards achieving a new understanding of a country with potential for development into parallel treatments of locally based cultural phenomena. The series welcomes monographs as well as collected papers.

 

For information about submitting proposals to these series, please contact oxford@peterlang.com.

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