Theories of Dynamic Cosmopolitanism in Modern European History published

It is often assumed that cosmopolitan thinkers since the Renaissance have simply adopted and refined concepts from classical antiquity. This study argues that modern European cosmopolitanism should be perceived as a unique phenomenon, distinct from Greek and Roman forms of cosmopolitan thinking. One key feature is its dynamism, or the idea of change built into modern theories of cosmopolitanism.

Covering the period from the 1530s to the 1920s, this book investigates various manifestations of cosmopolitanism, including normative individualism, the dawn of historical thinking, and the dynamic conceptions of law and rights and of the international community. It analyses the international legal theories of selected authors from Francisco de Vitoria to Austrian lawyers Heinrich Lammasch and Alfred Verdross. The author focuses in particular on the development of hospitality rights and the right to immigration, republicanism and cosmopolitanism, and cosmopolitan education.

Available for purchase here.

Georg Cavallar teaches modern history at the University of Vienna and has published on Kant’s political philosophy, the history of international law, and the philosophy of cosmopolitanism. His publications include The Rights of Strangers: Theories of International Hospitality, the Global Community and Political Justice since Vitoria (2002), Imperfect Cosmopolis: Studies in the History of International Legal Theory and Cosmopolitan Ideas (2011), and Kant’s Embedded Cosmopolitanism: History, Philosophy and Education for World Citizens (2015).

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