Towards a Resilient Eurozone published

Ryan cover (Eurozone)This book examines the Eurozone crisis and the possibility of fiscal and political union in Europe, with contributions from some of the most respected experts on these topics. The book explains the complex, multidimensional crises in competitiveness, fiscal matters, banking and politics. During the crisis Germany has been criticized for misjudging the causes, focusing too much on fiscal deficits and insisting that the solution is fiscal consolidation and austerity. For many, especially those inspired by Keynesian economics, Germany has been seen as pushing the whole continent into a depression. By misjudging the causes of the crisis, insisting on widespread austerity, constraining the European central Bank (ECB) in its role of Lender of Last Resort for the overeigns, rejecting the mutualization of Eurozone debt and providing financial help in small amounts and too late, Germany is perceived to be responsible for the possible break-up of the Eurozone. The aim of this book is to analyse whether this description, one that is shared by numerous policymakers, academics, pundits and opinion leaders, means that there is a lack of resilience in the Eurozone’s economic, monetary and fiscal policies.

Available for purchase here.

John Ryan is a Visiting Fellow at LSE IDEAS (International Strategy and Diplomacy). He is also a Research Associate at the Von Hügel Institute of St Edmund’s College, University of Cambridge. He was Head of School at SCMS London, an international campus of SCMS Cochin, India, and a Fellow at the Centre for International Studies, LSE. He was also a Fellow at the EU Integration section of the German Institute for International and Security Affairs in Berlin, Germany. Professor Ryan has held senior administrative and academic positions at various business schools and policy institutes. He works as a senior adviser for private and public sector organizations.

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