Reviewing Dante’s Theology

Honess coverThe two volumes of Reviewing Dante’s Theology bring together work by a range of internationally prominent Dante scholars to assess current research on Dante’s theology and to suggest future directions for research.
Volume 1 considers some of the key theological influences on Dante. The contributors discuss what ‘doctrine’ might have meant for Dante and consider the poet’s engagement with key theological figures and currents in his time including: Christian Aristotelian and scholastic thought, including that of Thomas Aquinas; Augustine; Plato and Platonic thought; Gregory the Great; and notions of beatific vision. Each essay offers an overview of its topic and opens up new avenues for future study. Together they capture the energy of current research in the field, test the limits of our current knowledge and set the future study of Dante’s theology on firm ground.

Volume 2 considers some of the broader social, cultural and intellectual contexts for Dante’s theological engagement. The contributors discuss the relationship between theology and poetry as Dante sees and presents it; Dante’s thought on the nature of the Church; the ways in which liturgical practice helped shape the poet’s work; the links between Dante’s political and theological ideas; the importance of preaching in Dante’s context; the ways in which the notion of virtue connects theological and ethical thought in Dante’s works; and the extent to which Dante’s often surprising, groundbreaking work tests medieval notions of orthodoxy. Each essay offers an overview of its topic and opens up new avenues.

Both volumes are available here.

Claire E. Honess is Professor of Italian Studies and Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Leeds, where she also co-directs the Leeds Centre for Dante Studies.
Matthew Treherne is Senior Lecturer in Italian at the University of Leeds and co-director of the Leeds Centre for Dante Studies. He is principal investigator for the research project ‘Dante and Late Medieval Florence: Theology in Poetry, Practice and Society’.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: