Ghosts of the Revolution in Mexican Literature and Visual Culture

Segre coverThe official centenary commemorating the Mexican Revolution of 1910 provided scholars with an opportunity to consider memorialization and its legacies and ‘afterimages’ in the twentieth century through to the present time. This collection of new essays, commissioned from experts based in Mexico, Europe and the United States, plays on the interrelated notions of ‘revisitation’, haunting, residual traces and valediction to interrogate the Revolution’s multiple appearances, reckonings and reconfigurations in art, photography, film, narrative fiction, periodicals, travel-testimonies and poetry, examining key constituencies of creative media in Mexico that have been involved in historicizing, contesting or evading the mixed legacies of the Revolution. The interplay of themes, practices and contexts across the chapters (ranging from the 1920s through to the present day) draws on interdisciplinary thinking as well as new findings, framing the volume’s discourse with a deliberately multi-dimensional approach to an often homogenized topic. The contributors’ scholarly referencing of artists, novelists, poets, photographers, foreign correspondents, critics, filmmakers and curators is detailed and wide-ranging, creating new juxtapositions that include some rarely studied material.

Erica Segre is Lecturer in Latin American and Hispanic Studies and Fellow of Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. She specializes in nineteenth-century Latin American literature and thought and twentieth-century and contemporary visual culture. Her monograph Intersected Identities: Strategies of Visualization in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Mexican Culture was published in 2007.

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